Grammar tip #6


This photo was taken along a road on August 4, 2015, in Connecticut. It was taken at the end of a long day after a dance workshop there. The workshop was hosted by Pilobolus Dance Company and very, very fun and body-exhausting. I found out I was pregnant after I signed up for the workshop. So for a while, I contemplated going anyway. But, then, I wasn't pregnant. I had a miscarriage at 9 weeks. So, at this time in my life, I was processing how to keep on trying to have a kid. At this moment, I was between my first and second miscarriages, ahead of one failed in vitro fertilization treatment (which took place in January 2016), and six months away from becoming pregnant naturally.

Fifteen months after this photo was taken, on November 9, 2016, my son, Kaden, was born. He just turned five and I'm just so impressed with him day after day. I love my little family of three. Here's my grammar/life message for today. In your journey, look and stop for the metaphorical sunflowers. Bask in the good light. Find ways to enjoy the path. And to help you see what is easy to overlook, be like a kid and ask lots of questions. One of the first questions related to reading that my son asked us was "What is hope?" We were reading a little book about Maya Angelou. Whoa! So, how about these questions . . .

Where does the word Connecticut come from? What does this word mean? I just spent some time finding out the where and what. The spelling of Connecticut is the result of a European interpretation of the Mahican/Mohican word "quinnitukqut" meaning “at the long tidal river.” From Wikionary: *kwen- (“long”) + *-ehtekw (“tidal river”) + *-enk (“place”).

And because I get pulled in further and further once I begin to look for information, I learned this: The Mahicans were an Eastern Algonquian Indian tribe in the New England area. The book The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper incorrectly combines the details of two or maybe three tribes that lived in the New England area, not just the Mahicans/Mohicans (these words seems interchangeable for describing one tribe). My source of information and where you can find out much more is here: http://www.native-languages.org/mohicans_words.htm. These are questions that came to my mind as I wrote this blog post. What are yours?